The Women’s March: A Photo Essay

Hundreds of protesters gathered at marches and rallies in both Raleigh and Durham on Saturday to protest the abortion ban in Texas that outlaws abortion after 6 weeks that went into effect this past week. The protests were organized by Women’s March and took place in 700 cities across the country. Warning: some signs contain graphic language and imagery.

Roughly a thousand protesters gathered at the Bicentennial Plaza in Downtown Raleigh to demand reproductive justice. Photo by Eden Richman
A speaker shares her personal experience with receiving abortion in Texas. Photo by Eden Richman
Photo Courtesy of Ella Perin
Protesters in Raleigh. Photo by Eden Richman
A protester dressed as a Handmaid from the dystopian novel by Margaret Atwood, holds up her sign in downtown Raleigh. Photo by Eden Richman
A Planned Parenthood doctor describes his patients’ experiences seeking abortions. Photo by Eden Richman
A speaker advocates offers QR codes so protesters could take action in Raleigh. Photo Courtesy of Ella Perin
An advocate gives a speech in a Raleigh on a make shift stage. Photo by Eden Richman
Photo courtesy of Ella Perin
Women dressed as a Handmaids from the dystopian novel by Margaret Atwood pose for a picture after the rally in Raleigh. Photo by Eden Richman
Photo courtesy of Ella Perin
Planned Parenthood had a table at the Raleigh march offering stickers and information. Photo by Eden Richman
Photo courtesy of Ella Perin
Protesters rally in downtown Durham. Photo by Eden Richman
Protesters hold up their signs at the downtown Durham march.
Photo by Eden Richman
A protester poses in front of the Durham Bull. Photo by Eden Richman
Photo by Eden Richman
A woman holds up her sign after the march in downtown Durham. Photo by Eden Richman
Many protesters had “Don’t Tread on Me” imagery in reference to the Gadsden flag, originally created during the American Revolution, and now often used as a symbolic of limited government and constitutionalism. Photo by Eden Richman
Messages at both rallies extended the struggle for abortion access beyond cisgender women, in movement for increased inclusivity. Photo courtesy of Ella Perin
Uterus and female reproductive imagery was an aspect of many signs. Photo courtesy of Ella Perin
Activist’s sign references the 6 week abortion ban enacted in Texas. Six weeks is two weeks after a missed period, often too soon for a woman to realize she is pregnant. Photo by Ella Perin
Sign displays stripes from the transgender, genderfluid, and nonbinary flags. Photo courtesy of Ella Perin
Photo by Eden Richman

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